Festival of the Reversing Current - Cambodian Water Festival (Bon Om Tuk) 2018 | Cambodia, Dates , Venues & Tickets

Festival of the Reversing Current - Cambodian Water Festival (Bon Om Tuk) 2018

Where:   Phnom Penh, Cambodia
When:    Thursday, November 22, 2018 - Saturday, November 24, 2018
Details are subject to change by the organizers, for final event location & dates, check "Event related information" section below.
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Every year on full moon in November (different dates), the Cambodias celebrate the Bon Om Tuk (Cambodian Water Festivals and ASEAN Tourism Boat Races).

The holiday takes place for three days of color and beauty that express the residents' joy to the end of the rain's season. On a big fiesta that is held on Phnom Penh (in addition to other cities) night boat's contest is held.

Thousands of people, local and tourists pour into town and the demand for accommodation is higher than usual, therefore it is advisable to check hotel prices and make reservations ahead of time.

The event takes place on the end of the rain season with the change of the water's flow on ''Tonle Sap River''. The flow direction is changes twice a year. The change in November symbols the calm of the earth that is no longer under the water.

The holiday's events preserve a tradition that began on the 12th century, in spite of the fact that the events as now days started only on 1990.

Many hotels suggest free cancellation option or NO PREPAYMENT NEEDED – Pay at the property.  
Attractive and lowest prices, suited for all budgets. Confirmation of your reservation will be mailed to
you promptly as part of the easy and simple reservation process.
Cambodia’s Water Festival
Cambodia’s Water Festival, Photo by: www.tourismcambodia.org
IMPORTANT:
Please note that the details of the event are subject to change. We strongly recommended that you check with the organizers before making any travel arrangements.
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Event related information
Contact: 
Phone: (855)23 212837/ 213911 Fax: (855)23 216875/ 426364

Phnom Penh travel information
Dialing code: 23
Longitude: 104.91667°
Latitude: 11.55°
Cambodia information address: No. 63, Street 348, Sangkat Toul Svay Prey II, Khan Chamkamorn, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Tel.: +855(0)23 211593 / 213741 Fax: +855(0)23 212837
Tourist website: www.mot.gov.kh

Cambodia country details
Location: Southeastern Asia, bordering the Gulf of Thailand, between Thailand, Vietnam, and Laos.
Capital: Phnom Penh
Currency: riel (KHR)
Voltage and Frequency: 230V 50Hz
Dialing country code: +855
Language: Khmer (official) 95%, French, English.

Cambodia background and overview:
Most Cambodians consider themselves to be Khmers, descendants of the Angkor Empire that extended over much of Southeast Asia and reached its zenith between the 10th and 13th centuries. Attacks by the Thai and Cham (from present-day Vietnam) weakened the empire ushering in a long period of decline. The king placed the country under French protection in 1863. Cambodia became part of French Indochina in 1887. Following Japanese occupation in World War II, Cambodia gained full independence from France in 1953. In April 1975, after a five-year struggle, Communist Khmer Rouge forces captured Phnom Penh and evacuated all cities and towns. At least 1.5 million Cambodians died from execution, forced hardships, or starvation during the Khmer Rouge regime under POL POT. A December 1978 Vietnamese invasion drove the Khmer Rouge into the countryside, began a 10-year Vietnamese occupation, and touched off almost 13 years of civil war. The 1991 Paris Peace Accords mandated democratic elections and a ceasefire, which was not fully respected by the Khmer Rouge. UN-sponsored elections in 1993 helped restore some semblance of normalcy under a coalition government. Factional fighting in 1997 ended the first coalition government, but a second round of national elections in 1998 led to the formation of another coalition government and renewed political stability. The remaining elements of the Khmer Rouge surrendered in early 1999. Some of the remaining leaders are awaiting trial by a UN-sponsored tribunal for crimes against humanity. Elections in July 2003 were relatively peaceful, but it took one year of negotiations between contending political parties before a coalition government was formed.
[Courtesy of The World Factbook]
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